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Statistics books for educational psychologists?

Statistics books for educational psychologists?



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I plan to study educational psychology in the near future. I know research methods is a big thing for educational psychologists, so I wanted to get a firm grip on the statistical knowledge required for research methods. Thus, I am looking for good stats books for educational psychologists? Either that or a lists of stats methods that an educational psychologist should master/know.

Thanks!


Cross Validated has a long list of answers to, "What book would you recommend for non-statistician scientists?" including an answer from our own @JeromyAnglim regarding SPSS for psychologists. Jeromy has also listed a number of good recommendations in response to The current recommended text for statistics in behavioural sciences, and @Mike suggested one for R users such as myself. I hesitate to recreate their content here because their original wording seems appropriate to preserve, and I'd rather have you read their answers and upvote them than try to take any credit myself.

I'd offer additional recommendations of my own if I had any good ones, but my stats textbooks were pretty deficient in retrospect, and I've had to overwrite a great deal of my formal education in psychological statistics through more diffuse study of sources other than textbooks. My standards for "a firm grip" on statistical research methods are probably more stringent than is truly necessary though, so my experience shouldn't concern you necessarily.

Also, FWIW, I had good but limited experiences with the textbooks that were assigned to me in my graduate stats classes for all areas of doctoral study in psychology (which excluded ed psych at my alma mater). My experiences with these were limited because I borrowed from colleagues instead of buying to save money. I will provide references to these books below. They were assigned by two psychometricians whose professional opinions I hold in high regard, one of whom is the primary author, Bob Rosenthal.

References

Cohen, J., Cohen, P., West, S. G., & Aiken, L. S. (2003). Applied multiple regression/correlation analysis for the behavioral sciences (3rd ed.). Routledge.

Rosenthal, R., & Rosnow, R. L. (2007). Essentials of behavioral research: Methods and data analysis (3rd ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill. Presently available used from $1.11.


In my country, studying educational psychology is a postgraduate qualification. It implies that you have completed an undergraduate sequence in psychology, and therefore would have already been exposed to the basics of statistics and research methods (e.g., univariate, bivariate statistics, significance testing, various ANOVA, regression, study designs, measurement reliability/validity, etc.). This may also include a subject on multivariate methods (e.g., factor analysis, logistic regression, perhaps a little SEM, etc.). Popular texts within psychology courses for this material include Andy Field's book and Tabachnick and Fidell Using Multivariate Statistics.

Thus, for students coming into an postgraduate Educational Psychology program, they may need a refresher or consolidation of the above statistical methods.

In general, educational psychology uses a lot of the same statistical techniques as other areas of psychology. A few techniques of particular relevance include:

  • Multivariate methods: In particular, regression, factor analysis, SEM and so on are all common techniques for analysing observational studies common in educational psychology
  • Multi-level modelling: to model longitudinal data (e.g., student change) or students nested within classrooms or schools
  • Various models related to measurement and test design: In particular Item Response Theory, Classical Test Theory, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis
  • Meta-analysis: to systematically evaluate interventions and other findings across studies

Ultimately, how well you want to learn any of the above techniques depends on your aims. These more advanced techniques can help you read the literature, and are particularly important if you want to do research using the technique.


COLLEGE OF EDUCATION COLLEGE OF EDUCATION EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

EDPSY 302 Child Development and Learning (5) I&S
Uses readings, discussions, naturalistic observations, and "virtual" children to understand the different ways children develop - physically, cognitively, social-emotionally, in language and literacy, and in approaches to learning - during early childhood, the interplay between each of these domains and the environmental context, and the theories about the developmental mechanisms underlying these changes.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 302

EDPSY 305 Applied Child Development and Learning (5) I&S
Examination of the latest research on brain development in early childhood and the application of this knowledge in the creation of learning environments that promote physical, language, cognitive, social, and emotional development. The roles of family, classroom, and community provide context to build relationships that support each child's development.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 305

EDPSY 380 Adult Learning and Development (5) I&S C. GLASS HASTINGS
Examination of current research and practice in the field of adult education, learning, and development. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 380

EDPSY 404 Adolescent Development (5) Joe L. Lott II.
Students use readings, discussion, and interview data to understand adolescent development. Discusses multiple domains of development, as well as the contextually situated nature of adolescence. Highlights implications for educators, policy makers, and others who serve the needs of adolescents throughout the course. Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 404

EDPSY 405 Adolescents and Media: Challenges in the 21st Century Classroom (3) I&S
Encourages students to consider classrooms of the future while reflecting on their own classroom experiences. Examines adolescents' informal use of media today, some of the ways media can affect young people, and the implications of these effects in a classroom setting.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 405

EDPSY 406 Learning and Teaching in our Changing World: Insights from Experience and Research (5) I&S
Human learning in the educational setting. Cognition, development, learning, motivation, affective processes, and socialization. Emphasis on skills in influencing classroom learning and discipline.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 406

EDPSY 420 Bullying, Revenge, and Belonging: Cultural Perspectives on Social Power (4) I&S, DIV
Examines theories and research on bullying, revenge, and bystander behavior with a particular focus on cultural norms. Identifies the institutional, social, emotional, and ethical characteristics and processes that support exploitive relationships, revenge and their inclusive alternatives. Practical interventions are presented and evaluated.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 420

EDPSY 425 Bullies, Victims, and Bystanders: Social Power In (4) I&S
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 425

EDPSY 431 Strategies for Classroom Research and Evaluation (5)
Techniques and strategies for the design and implementation of studies of classroom instruction. Directed toward classroom teachers as consumers of instructional research and as evaluators in their own classrooms. Credit/no-credit only.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 431

EDPSY 447 Principles of Guidance (3)
Study of guidance programs in elementary and secondary schools. Attention is given to the roles of specialists with emphasis on the role of the classroom teacher in school guidance programs. Designed for teachers, administrators, and prospective teachers.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 447

EDPSY 449 Laboratory in Educational Psychology (2-6, max. 6)
Special studies for counselors, teachers, administrators, and others concerned with student personnel and psychological services in schools and colleges. Focuses on special topics that have either local or contemporary significance.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 449

EDPSY 471 Educational Neuropsychology (5) NW Berninger
Covers brain systems underlying normal development and academic learning: sensory and motor, language, cognitive, social emotional, and executive-functions for self-regulation alone and interaction with the physical and social worlds in and out of school.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 471

EDPSY 472 Teaching Reading, Writing, and Math with Brain in Mind (5) I&S
Students learn evidence-based guiding principles for designing and implementing instruction with brain in mind (developing mental worlds through other -regulated and self-regulated interactions with external physical and social environments that are multi-culturally sensitive and support learning that creates reading, writing, and math brains). Prerequisite: EDPSY 471. Instructors: Berninger Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 472

EDPSY 490 Basic Educational Statistics (3) NW, QSR Elizabeth A. Sanders, Chun Wang, Min Li, Oscar Olvera Astivia
Concepts include measurement scales, central tendency, variability, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, null hypothesis significance testing (z/t/chi-square), statistical power, and simple regression and correlation. Recommended: coursework in either pre-algebra or algebra. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 490

EDPSY 499 Undergraduate Research (*)
Students developing studies under this rubric should be advised that a report or a paper setting forth the results of their investigations should be regarded as a basic part of the program. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 499

EDPSY 500 Field Study I: Academic Consultation (1-3, max. 6) K. MISSALL
Includes study and practice in methods of Tier II academic consultation within an MTSS framework. Prepares students to effectively work with other professionals to better meet the social-emotional and behavioral needs of students and improve the learning environment for students identified as behaviorally and academically 'at-risk'. Prerequisite: EDSPY 554. Offered: WSp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 500

EDPSY 501 Human Learning and Educational Practice (3)
Systematic examination of current research about human learning in educational settings, including the study of behavioral, information processing, social construction, and the developmental perspectives on learning. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 501

EDPSY 502 Developmental Foundations of Early Learning (3)
Perceptual-motor, language, and overall cognitive development in children from birth through primary-school age. Emphasis on Piagetian and Vygotskian approaches to development with a special focus on the connections between learning and development. Field-based course projects may be required. Prerequisite: EDPSY 501 or permission. Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 502

EDPSY 503 Culture Learning and Development (4) M. BANG
Explores influential contemporary research and theory they view culture as foundational to learning and development. Considers these issues in a range of settings (classrooms, informal environments, families, early childhood to adult learners, etc.) and within specific domains (e.g. science, literacy, mathematics. Prerequisite: EDPSY 501 and graduate status in education or psychology. Credit/no-credit only. Offered: A.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 503

EDPSY 504 Intercollegiate Athletic Leadership:Athlete and Team Wellness (3) Polo DeCano
Explores the responsibility of athletics coaches to develop a team culture oriented toward the welfare of student-athletes. Discusses how psychological and physiological factors affect athlete performance and overall wellness. Explores strategies for team motivation, group cohesion, and resiliency. Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 504

EDPSY 505 Field Study II: Tier III Interventions (1-2, max. 3)
Individual study of an educational problem in the field under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: EDPSY 557 Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 505

EDPSY 506 Instructional Theory (3)
Sources, current state, and utility of prescriptive instructional theories with emphasis upon theories having a potential for guiding the design of instruction. Prerequisite: EDPSY 501 or equivalent.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 506

EDPSY 507 Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic: Educational Assessment and Consultation (5)
Students administer and interpret tests of reading, writing, arithmetic, and related developmental skills integrate test, observational, interview, and portfolio information in staffings and written reports and consult with teachers regarding educational interventions. Prerequisite: graduate standing in the school psychology specialization and permission of instructor. Instructors: Cook Offered: A.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 507

EDPSY 508 Advanced Practicum in Supervision and School Mental Health (2-6, max. 20) S. KING
Advanced practicum in providing in counseling, consultation, and behavioral interventions in schools while also supervising field study students in providing basic interventions. Offered: A.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 508

EDPSY 509 Educational Issues in Human Development (5)
Human development theories and models. Educational implications of theory, methodology, and application. Current research complements the historical antecedents of current practice. Age range covered varies as function of current issues in professional literature. Prerequisite: 15 credits in educational psychology or psychology.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 509

EDPSY 510 Cognition in the Context of the School Curriculum (3)
Contemporary issues and trends in human learning, with a focus on reasoning within subject-matter areas such as mathematics, history, and science. Prerequisite: EDPSY 501 or equivalent. Instructors: Bell, McCutchen
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 510

EDPSY 511 Seminar in Applied Educational Psychology (1, max. 6)
Designed for graduate students in educational psychology. Applications of theoretical constructs to particular problems encountered in school counseling, practice.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 511

EDPSY 512 Classroom Assessment Strategies (3)
Development and evaluation of traditional, observational, essay, performance-based, portfolio assessments and grading models as they are used in classroom assessment some review of current research on classroom-based assessment classroom assessment ethics. Prerequsite: EDPSY 490 or equivalent.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 512

EDPSY 513 Survey Instrument Development (3) Oscar Olvera Astivia, Chun Wang
Focuses on understanding tensions and issues involved in designing survey instruments for measuring latent constructs, including basic sampling procedures, best practices in item construction, and considerations about potential mode, method, question sensitivity, and order effects on validity of responses. Prerequisite: EDPSY 490. Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 513

EDPSY 514 History of Educational Technology (3)
Examines the role of technology in education through history. Early systems of instruction, advent of textbooks, models for school architecture, instructional devices and teaching machines, mediated and distance learning. Focuses on the interplay between designed educational approaches and contexts in which they were implemented, and consequent success for failure.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 514

EDPSY 515 Current Issues in Technology and Education (3)
Examines current genres of learning technology, novel approaches for integrating technology into curriculum and instruction, and recent theoretical perspectives that inform future work in educational technology.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 515

EDPSY 516 Survey of Educational Technology Research (2-, max. 4)
Critically examines active research projects in educational technology. Critiques of research practice.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 516

EDPSY 517 Applied Measurement in Educational Research (3) Elizabeth A. Sanders
Examines typical quantitative research designs in educational research with specific regard to different kinds of validity considerations, including critical quantitative methods. Project focuses on proposal for developing, adapting, refining, or re-purposing an observed measure of a latent construct. Teaches the American Psychological Association (APA) citation style. Prerequisite: EDPSY 490. Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 517

EDPSY 518 Assessment and Diagnosis of Reading Disabilities (3)
Techniques for individual assessment of students with reading difficulties (K-12) including formal assessment using standard assessment tools and informal diagnostic teaching. Appropriate for classroom teachers, reading specialists, and school psychologists. Includes conducting and analyzing case studies. Prerequisite: EDC&I 460, EDC&I 462, other reading courses, or permission of instructor. Instructors: Valencia
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 518

EDPSY 519 Vulnerable Children and Families in Comparative Perspective: Psychosocial Development Processes (3) Jegatheesan
Research and theory examining the effects of disability, poverty, trauma, and immigration and its impact on child development across cultures, effective interventions in educational and non-educational settings, and the consequences of critical issues in the context of psycho-social and development processes in different cultural and international contexts. Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 519

EDPSY 520 Psychology of Reading (3)
Reviews current empirical research on cognitive processes in reading, including word and sub-word processes, syntax and comprehension, reading and perception, word recognition, concept development, and meaning in reading, psychology of reading interests, and skills. Prerequisite: EDPSY 501 or equivalent. Instructors: McCutchen Credit/no-credit only. Offered: WS.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 520

EDPSY 521 Psychology of Writing (3)
Examines writing as a cognitive process and reviews current empirical research on writing, emphasizing primarily studies from a psychological perspective. Explores both developmental differences and individual differences in writing skills, together with instructional implications. Prerequisite: EDPSY 501 or equivalent. Instructors: McCutchen Credit/no-credit only. Offered: WS.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 521

EDPSY 522 Teaching Reading, Writing, and Math with Brain in Mind (5)
Students learn evidence-based guiding principles for designing and implementing instruction with brain in mind (developing mental worlds through other -regulated and self-regulated interactions with external physical and social environments that are multi-culturally sensitive and support learning that creates reading, writing, and math brains). Prerequisite: EDPSY 471, EDPSY 577, or permission of instructor. Instructors: Berninger Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 522

EDPSY 523 Foundations of Ethnographic Research (3) Jegatheesan
Exploration of the main components of ethnographic endeavor. Students conduct ethnographic research including field entry, observing, listening, data analysis, and writing typical issues and quandaries encountered in carrying fieldwork in a variety of settings, ethical issues, comprehension, intrusion, and access, experience and empathy, and power dynamics, and predicament.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 523

EDPSY 524 Problem Solving and Critical Thinking in Education (3)
Study of the classic and contemporary research literature concerned with human problem solving and critical thinking with emphasis upon applications to educational practice and further research. Prerequisite: EDPSY 501 or equivalent.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 524

EDPSY 525 Creativity and Education (3)
Study of the classic and contemporary research literature about creativity with emphasis upon applications to educational practice, evaluation of strategies to promote creativity in the schools, and further research. Prerequisite: EDPSY 501 or equivalent.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 525

EDPSY 526 Seminar on Metacognition (3)
Students read and discuss theoretical and research papers from the extensive literature on metacognition. Focuses on defining the concept of metacognition, establishing its range of applicability to educational matters, and becoming familiar with excellent examples of metacognitive research. Prerequisite: graduate status in education or psychology and permission of instructor. Instructors: Nolan
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 526

EDPSY 527 Transfer of Teaching (3)
Students read and discuss a representative sample of theoretical and research papers from extensive literature on teaching to promote transfer of what students learn to non-teaching environments. Historical approach to the topic is followed by analysis of current writings on transfer. Prerequisite: EDPSY 501 and graduate status in education or psychology. Instructors: Bell, Shouse Credit/no-credit only.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 527

EDPSY 528 Achievement Motivation in Education (3)
Critical review of current research and major theories of achievement motivation in schools and other educational settings. Emphasis on the relationship of theories to the contexts and practice of education. Prerequisite: EDPSY 501 or permission of instructor. Instructors: Nolan Offered: WS.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 528

EDPSY 529 Developmental Psychopathology and the DSM (2) W. LAU
Provides an opportunity for advanced doctoral students to learn the basics of using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM) for assessment and diagnosis in clinical practice and learn about childhood disorders across the lifespan. Offered: A.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 529

EDPSY 530 Vygotsky's Socio-Cultural Approach to Mind (5)
Critical reading and discussion of the work of L.S. Vygotsky as well as contemporary psychologists and educators who have investigated cognition in social context. Discusses the implications of these approaches for the design of learning environments. Prerequisite: EDPSY 501. Instructors: Herrenkohl Credit/no-credit only. Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 530

EDPSY 531 Socialization of School-Age Children (3)
Study of personal social development and behavior from preschool ages through adolescence. Developmental theory and research are reviewed on the socialization influences of parents and peers and on such topics as aggression, emotional regulation, and social cognition. Prerequisite: EDPSY 501 or equivalent.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 531

EDPSY 532 Adolescence and Youth (3)
Developmental processes and patterns examined with major theoretical and current research themes from behavioral sciences as applied to middle school and senior high students. Educational issues, social problems associated with adolescence in Western culture. Prerequisite: EDPSY 501 or equivalent.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 532

EDPSY 533 Current Research in Adolescence (3)
Contemporary trends and patterns of adolescent research are examined with emphasis upon theoretical foundations, contrasting methodologies, and implications for further research. Exemplary studies and integrative reviews of research on adolescence are featured. Prerequisite: EDPSY 532 and EDPSY 591 or equivalents.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 533

EDPSY 534 School Problems of Adolescence (3)
Study of the classic, contemporary, and emerging school problems of school age youth with emphasis upon problem solving strategies for educators and associated youth service personnel. Includes problems of academic achievement, interpersonal relations, and social deviancy in the schools. Prerequisite: EDPSY 532 or equivalent.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 534

EDPSY 535 Education and the Highly Capable Learner (3) N. HERTZOG
Examination of major issues and problems in study and nurturance of highly capable children and youth in the educational setting. Emphasis placed on contributions of theory and research to educational problem solving for multiple aspects of advanced human capacity. Prerequisite: EDPSY 501 or equivalent.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 535

EDPSY 536 Immigrant and Indigenous Children: Social Context of Learning (3) Jegatheesan
Focuses on the broad context of family, school, and society of immigrant and indigenous young children in the United States. Introduces the complex interplay of socio-cultural and psychological factors that impact these children's learning. Offered: WS.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 536

EDPSY 537 Teaching and Learning Science with Indigenous Students (3) Megan Bang
Provides an overview of the opportunities and challenges in teaching science to Indigenous learners. Students develop relevant pedagogical frameworks to approach problems of practice and develop high-leverage instructional practices for Indigenous students. Focused on Indigenous students however is relevant to other under-achieving populations. Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 537

EDPSY 538 Multiple Regression (3)
Quantitative methods for students in the social, behavioral, and health sciences. Focuses on understanding, estimating, interpreting, and reporting results for univariate multiple regression models for metrical and categorical outcomes, from a frequentist perspective. Prerequisite: EDPSY 490 or equivalent. Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 538

EDPSY 539 Classic Test Theory Reliability and Validity (3) Min Li
An examination of assumptions involved in Classic Test Theory, including measurement error, factors affecting reliability and validity, item analysis, and standards for educational and psychological measurement. Prerequisite: EDPSY 538. Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 539

EDPSY 540 School Psychological Assessment (5)
Study of assessment of human intelligence with supervised training in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of individual intelligence tests. Prerequisite: admission to School Psychology program. Instructors: Jones Offered: A.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 540

EDPSY 544 Counseling (4) J. MAZZA
Competency-based skills training for beginning counseling and school psychology students. Covers attending, listening, focusing, and intervening behaviors for use with adults and children. Introduction to theories of helping. Prerequisite: admission to School Psychology program. Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 544

EDPSY 545 Prepracticum (3)
Competency-based skills training for beginning counseling and school psychology students. Attending, listening, focusing, and intervening behaviors for use with adults and children. Introduction to theories of helping. Prerequisite: graduate standing in school psychology or permission of instructor. Offered: A.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 545

EDPSY 546 Counseling Practicum (3-5, max. 20) J. MAZZA
Supervised practice in counseling. Prerequisite: admission to School Psychology program EDPSY 544. Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 546

EDPSY 548 Educational Implications of Personality Theory (5) J. MAZZA
Study of personality development and personality theories with continuous attention to the meaning of these in educational practice, testing, and counseling. Prerequisite: admission to the School Psychology program. Offered: A.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 548

EDPSY 549 Seminar in Consultation Methods (3)
Theory and practice of process consultation in educational settings. Field practice in teams with clients. Prerequisite: admission to the School Psychology program. Instructors: Cook Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 549

EDPSY 550 Family Counseling (3)
Introduction to family counseling theory and practice, emphasizing family dynamics and communication analysis. Prerequisite: graduate standing in school psychology or permission of instructor. Instructors: Jones Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 550

EDPSY 551 Group and Behavioral Intervention (3)
Introduction to competency-based skills for beginning school psychology students. Includes basic processes of group management skills with children including group process in social skills training, problem-solving techniques, behavioral principles, and parent training. Prerequisite: admission to School Psychology program. Instructors: Cook Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 551

EDPSY 552 Multicultural Issues in School Counseling and School Psychology (3)
Examination of multicultural issues as they relate to the delivery of services provided by school counselors and school psychologists. Theoretical and applied aspects emphasized and case study format utilized. Prerequisite: admission to School Psychology program. Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 552

EDPSY 553 School Psychology Services with Special Populations (3)
Examines current issues in working with youth in special populations, as well as intervention strategies to help these students within the mainstream school environment. Prerequisite: admission to School Psychology program. Instructors: Murphy Credit/no-credit only. Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 553

EDPSY 554 Introduction to Multi-Tiered Systems of Support (3) K. MISSALL
Teaches the Multi-Tiered Systems of Support framework and provides instruction on how to conduct assessment, consultation, and evaluation intervention program effectiveness using both a direct service delivery as well as an indirect model (consultation). Offered: A.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 554

EDPSY 556 Applied Social Psychology: Implications for Education (3)
Provides students with the knowledge and understanding of how social psychology is applied within school settings and how it can be used to help develop effective strategies for psychological services. Prerequisite: admission to School Psychology program. Instructors: Cunningham, Mazza Credit/no-credit only. Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 556

EDPSY 557 Tier III Interventions for School Psychologists (3)
Provides school psychology students with a milt-tier framework in working with challenging students in schools. Provides explicit instruction on functional behavioral assessment, including content and training in how to work with youth who are at-risk or have engaged in self-harming and/or suicidal behavior. Prerequisite: admission to School Psychology program. Instructors: Cook, Mazza Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 557

EDPSY 558 Generalizability Theory (3) Min Li
Focuses on various designs and applications used with the Generalizability theory framework to estimate the amount of score variation associated with a measurement procedure, approach the reliability and validity issues, and optimize the measurement procedure. Prerequisite: EDPSY 539 recommended: introduction to educational statistics and measurement so that students are familiar with the basic concepts and procedures that we will continue working on in this course. Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 558

EDPSY 559 Validity Theory (3) Min Li
Introduces students to different perspectives and theories of test validity and to the process of accumulating validity evidence for measures used in educational field. As an advanced measurement course, we will address the argument-based validation approach proposed by Kane, and analyze important technical and philosophical aspects of test validity and validation. Prerequisite: EDPSY 539 recommended: understand the concepts of reliability and validity as well as the statistical procedures used to evaluate different types of validity claims under the classical test theory framework Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 559

EDPSY 560 Advanced Practicum in Personality Assessment (3)
Designed for doctoral-level school psychologists to learn advanced personality assessment for diagnosis of emotional and behavior disorders. Prerequisite: admission to School Psychology program EDPSY 540 EDPSY 564. Open to doctoral students only. Instructors: Jones
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 560

EDPSY 561 Test Instrument Development (3) Min Li
Test instrument development techniques including construct development, test and item specifications, item writing, planning for reliability and validity studies ethics in test administration and interpretation. Intended for doctoral or master's students to develop instruments for their own research. Prerequisite: EDPSY 539. Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 561

EDPSY 562 Group Counseling in Schools (3)
Provides students with the opportunity to co-facilitate groups in elementary, middle, and secondary schools, supplemented by weekly didactic presentations of counseling and guidance models. Prerequisite: EDPSY 561 or permission of instructor. Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 562

EDPSY 564 Practicum in School Psychology (1-6, max. 20)
Practicum in assessment and consultation, emphasizing diagnosis of behavior and learning disabilities, and focusing on techniques acquired in EDPSY 507 and EDPSY 540. Prerequisite: admission to School Psychology program EDPSY 507 EDPSY 540. Instructors: Jones, Lau Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 564

EDPSY 565 Advanced Practicum in Clinical Practice for Children and Adolescents with Psychopathology (4, max. 24) J. Jones
Designed for doctoral level school psychologists to learn advanced skills in clinical practice for working with children and adolescents with a range of childhood psychopathologies, under the supervision of a licensed psychologist. Prerequisite: EDPSY 544 and EDPSY 546, or equivalent and advanced graduate standing in the school psychology program. Offered: AWSp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 565

EDPSY 566 Case Study Seminar (1-6, max. 20)
Integrating theoretical concepts with practice/service issues. Cases selected for discussion represent a wide range of problems found in schools. Activities include group supervision and peer review. Prerequisite: graduate standing in school psychology. Instructors: Grady Offered: AWSp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 566

EDPSY 568 Seminar in Professional Issues and Ethics (3)
Professional ethics codes and cases, history of counseling or school psychology, legal problems, credentialing issues, conditions of practice, continuing education, publishing, and presenting research papers. Prerequisite: graduate standing in College of Education or permission of instructor. Instructors: Provenzano Credit/no-credit only. Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 568

EDPSY 569 Learning and the Interaction Order (3) K. TAYLOR
Covers research methods course for students using video and/or audio recordings as data in studies of learning and teaching. Students learn how to make evidence-based inferences about people's learning or teaching as captured by video/audio recordings by content logging, selecting, transcribing, and analyzing moments of interaction. Offered: S.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 569

EDPSY 570 Introduction to School Psychology (2, max. 20) J. MAZZA
Current issues in professional psychology practice and research. Prerequisite: admission to School Psychology program. Offered: A.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 570

EDPSY 571 Educating Individuals with Biologically Based Disabilities (5)
Reviews the history of neural science and its interdisciplinary roots, brain imaging methods and web resources, basic terminology and concepts for microscopic and larger neurological structures, functions, organizing principles and chemical bases, with focus on application to diagnosing and teaching students with developmental, learning, psychiatric, neurological, and medical disorders. Prerequisite: graduate standing in school psychology or inst Offered: W.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 571

EDPSY 572 Social-Emotional Assessment (3)
Techniques in social-emotional assessment of school-aged children. Diagnostic systems presented in conjunction with assessment techniques. Emphasis on an integrative method for understanding social emotional assessment batteries and reliability and validity of their test score interpretation. Prerequisite: admission to School Psychology program. Instructors: Cunningham Offered: A.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 572

EDPSY 573 Psychological Assessment of Preschool Children (5)
Students learn to give and interpret tests of intellectual development to assess language, play, and social/emotional functioning, and to write psychological assessment reports for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. Prerequisite: graduate standing in school psychology and permission of instructor. Instructors: Olson Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 573

EDPSY 575 Structural Equation Modeling I (3) Oscar Olvera Astivia
Theory and data analysis using linear structural equation models. Topics include path analysis, exploratory and confirmatory latent variable factor analysis, and structural regression models to evaluate relationships among latent variables. Prerequisite: EDPSY 538. Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 575

EDPSY 576 Multilevel Modeling (3) Elizabeth A. Sanders
Theory and data analysis for modeling nested data with random factors, including linear and generalized linear hierarchical models for cross-sectional data as well as basic growth models. Prerequisite: EDPSY 538. Offered: A.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 576

EDPSY 577 Neuropsychology of Learning and Behavior Problems (5)
Brings together our understanding of neuropsychology and specific behavioral and learning problems to provide a foundation for practitioners to consider neuropsychological contributors to problems observed in clinical and educational settings. Credit/no-credit only. Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 577

EDPSY 578 Educational Applications of Neuropsychology: Assessment and Intervention (5)
Students observe and administer neuropsychological tests and plan and carry out educational interventions for children with neuropsychological disorders. Content focuses on various neuropsychological disorders for which school psychologists can provide assessment and consultation. Prerequisite: EDPSY 540 or equivalent course in individual testing, and EDSPY 577 or permission of the instructor. Instructors: Berninger
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 578

EDPSY 579 Advanced Practicum in Neuropsychological Assessment and Neurodevelopmental Intervention (3, max. 18) Erin Olson
Provides advanced clinical training in neuropsychological assessment and evidence-based interventions for children with neurodevelopmental and/or mental health disorders. Training includes supervised administration of neuropsychological assessments and delivery of interventions with individuals and/or groups in clinic settings that provide services to children with suspected neurocognitive disabilities. Prerequisite: graduate standing in School Psychology or permission of instructor. Offered: AWSp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 579

EDPSY 580 Seminar: The Emergence of Educational Psychology (3)
Examination of documents by selected contributors to the field of educational psychology. Special focus on period from mid-nineteenth century to the later twentieth century.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 580

EDPSY 581 Seminar in Educational Psychology (1-5, max. 20)
Advanced seminar on selected topics in educational psychology. A critical appraisal of current research. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 581

EDPSY 582 Seminar in Development and Socialization (3, max. 15)
Advanced seminar on selected topics concerned with human development and socialization processes. Emphasis placed upon empirical research and its theoretical underpinnings in such areas as cognitive development, moral development and education, self-concept development, and related concerns. Prerequisite: graduate standing in College of Education or instructor permission. Instructors: Herrenkohl, Jegatheesan, Nolen, Kazemi
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 582

EDPSY 583 Seminar in Learning and Thinking (3, max. 15)
Seminar in the psychology of learning language and language learning. Each seminar is offered with predesignated emphasis in one of the following topics: linguistics, phonology, pragmatics, psycholinguistics, semantics. Prerequisite: graduate standing in College of Education or instructor permission.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 583

EDPSY 584 Special Topics in Quantitative Methods (3, max. 9) Oscar Olvera Astivia, Chun Wang, Elizabeth A. Sanders, Min Li
Seminar for special topics in quantitative methods involving psychometrics and applied inferential statistics. Prerequisite: EDPSY 538.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 584

EDPSY 585 History, Systems, and Contemporary Issues in School Psychology (3)
Covers the history, systems, and research relating to the contemporary issues relevant to research and practice of school psychology. Meets APA and Washington state requirements for course in history and systems of psychology. Prerequisite: admission to School Psychology program. Instructors: Jones, Mazza Credit/no-credit only. Offered: Sp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 585

EDPSY 586 Qualitative Methods of Educational Research I (4)
Survey of various qualitative research methods from a variety of disciplinary perspectives (anthropology, sociology, applied linguistics, cognitive psychology, policy analysis, and evaluation) with intensive experience in collection, analysis, and reporting of data. Prerequisite: second-year doctoral standing and one course in statistics, and permission of instructor. Offered: A.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 586

EDPSY 587 Qualitative Methods of Educational Research III (5)
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 587

EDPSY 588 Structural Equation Modeling II (3) Oscar Olvera Astivia
Advanced topics in structural equation modeling, focused heavily on models for latent and manifest variables, as well as multilevel structural equation models. Prerequisite: EDPSY 575 recommended: EDPSY 576. Offered: A, odd years.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 588

EDPSY 589 Scholarly Writing in Education and Psychology (3)
Introduction to the demands and expectations for technical writing in education and psychology, including aspects of the culture of scholarship. Designed for competent writers. Does not address basic grammar and composition. Prerequisite: doctoral standing, and permission of instructor. Credit/no-credit only.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 589

EDPSY 590 Computer Utilization in Educational Research (3)
Computer utilization in solution of research problems, data reduction to forms amenable to computer solution, appropriate framing of problems for solutions by computer. Using an interactive system, editors, and program packages. Prerequisite: EDPSY 490.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 590

EDPSY 591 Item Response Theory I (3) Chun Wang
Explores assumptions and applications of Item Response Theory (IRT) measurement models, testing and evaluating differential item functioning, and procedures for equating and linking. Prerequisite: EDPSY 539. Offered: A.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 591

EDPSY 592 Item Response Theory II (3) Chun Wang
Advanced topics in Item Response Theory, including multidimensional and multilevel models. Prerequisite: EDPSY 591. Offered: W, odd years.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 592

EDPSY 593 Cognitive Diagnostic Modeling (3) Chun Wang
Explores concepts and techniques for Cognitive Diagnostic Modeling (CDM). Prerequisite: EDPSY 591. Offered: Sp, odd years.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 593

EDPSY 594 Computerized Adaptive Testing (3) Chun Wang
Explorers concepts and models for computerized adaptive testing (CAT). Prerequisite: EDPSY 591. Offered: Sp, even years.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 594

EDPSY 595 Monte Carlo Simulations (3) Oscar Olvera Astivia
Methods, procedures, and assumptions involved in simulating univariate and multivariate normal and non-normal data, applying models to simulated data, saving simulation results, and assessing properties of simulated results. Prerequisite: either EDPSY 538 and graduate student standing in the Measurement and Statistics program, or permission of instructor. Offered: A, even years.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 595

EDPSY 596 Experimental Design and Analysis (3) Elizabeth A. Sanders
Compares different experimental designs considering the research questions and constraints, such as population size, timing, treatment conditions and implementation procedures, expected effect size, potential for contamination and non-compliance, and ethics. Example designs include block-randomized, cluster-randomized, cohort-sequential, step-wedge, and sequential, multiple assignment, randomized trials. Prerequisite: EDPSY 576. Offered: Sp, even years.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 596

EDPSY 597 Network Measurement and Analysis (3) Elizabeth A. Sanders
Covers measurement and analysis of networked data in education and related social sciences. Descriptive and inferential analysis methods explored, as well as data visualization. Prerequisite: EDPSY 576 recommended: EDPSY 513. Offered: Sp, odd years.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 597

EDPSY 598 Measurement and Statistics Pro-Seminar (1, max. 15) Elizabeth A. Sanders, Min Li, Chun Wang, Oscar Olvera Astivia
Prerequisite: graduate student standing in the Measurement and Statistics program. Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSp.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 598

EDPSY 599 Independent Studies in Education (*)
Independent studies or readings of specialized aspects of education. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 599

EDPSY 600 Independent Study or Research (*-)
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Offered: AWSpS.
View course details in MyPlan: EDPSY 600


Learning Statistics with R: A tutorial for psychology students and other beginners

Attribution-ShareAlike
CC BY-SA


Statistics education, a crucial component of the undergraduate psychology curriculum, is one of the most challenging topics for students to learn and for faculty to teach. For the Love of Teaching Undergraduate Statistics is designed to provide readers with advice, best practices, and fun ideas for teaching an introductory statistics course to undergraduate psychology students. Each chapter is informed by the 2014 American Psychological Association Statistical Literacy Task Force guidelines as well as the Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education (GAISE) from the American Statistical Association. Chapters are organized into five sections: course design, semester-long course projects, learning and engagement activities, teaching advanced topics, and utilizing open access statistical software. It concludes with a compendium of additional resources, organized by chapter topics. ISBN: 978-1-941804-57-5

Once the file is open, you can use the bookmark panel in Adobe Acrobat Reader to navigate to the specific chapters.

Feedback regarding the editorial content of this book or any of its essays should be directed toward the individual authors or the book's editors. They (authors and editors) are solely responsible for the substance of the text. Feedback regarding technical matters of formatting or accessibility of this text via the online environment of the Internet should be directed to the Internet Editor. If you have any complaints or difficulties in accessing these materials, be sure to provide as detailed a description of your problem(s) as you can you should include information about the browser you are using and the type of computer you are using.

Copyright and Other Legal Notices
The individual essays and chapters contained within this collection are Copyright © 2019 by their respective authors. This collection of essays and chapters as a compendium is Copyright © 2019 Society for the Teaching of Psychology. You may print multiple copies of these materials for your own personal use, including use in your classes and/or sharing with individual colleagues as long as the author's name and institution, and a notice that the materials were obtained from the website of the Society for the Teaching of Psychology (STP) appear on the copied document. For research and archival purposes, public libraries and libraries at schools, colleges, universities and similar educational institutions may print and store in their research or lending collections multiple copies of this compendium as a whole without seeking further permission of STP (the editors would appreciate receiving a pro forma notice of any such library use). No other permission is granted to you to print, copy, reproduce, or distribute additional copies of these materials. Anyone who wishes to print, copy, reproduce, or distribute copies for other purposes must obtain the permission of the individual copyright owners. Particular care should be taken to seek permission from the respective copyright holder(s) for any commercial or "for profit" use of these materials.


IRL @ UMSL

We are constantly bombarded by information, and finding a way to filter that information in an objective way is crucial to surviving this onslaught with your sanity intact. This is what statistics, and logic we use in it, enables us to do. Through the lens of statistics, we learn to find the signal hidden in the noise when it is there and to know when an apparent trend or pattern is really just randomness. The study of statistics involves math and relies upon calculations of numbers. But it also relies heavily on how the numbers are chosen and how the statistics are interpreted.

This work was created as part of the University of Missouri’s Affordable and Open Access Educational Resources Initiative (https://www.umsystem.edu/ums/aa/oer). The contents of this work have been adapted from the following Open Access Resources: Online Statistics Education: A Multimedia Course of Study (http://onlinestatbook.com/). Project Leader: David M. Lane, Rice University. Changes to the original works were made by Dr. Garett C. Foster in the Department of Psychological Sciences to tailor the text to fit the needs of the introductory statistics course for psychology majors at the University of Missouri – St. Louis. Materials from the original sources have been combined, reorganized, and added to by the current author, and any conceptual, mathematical, or typographical errors are the responsibility of the current author.

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Statistics books for educational psychologists? - Psychology

Posted In Additional support needs, November 14th, 2017

This article explains how educational psychologists support children with additional support needs and answers common questions we hear about from parents and carers about their role. (It was written with input from members of the Scottish Division of Educational Psychologists and the Association of Scottish Principal Educational Psychologists. Practice may differ in some local authority areas.)

What is the role of an educational psychologist?

Educational psychologists work within local authorities, in partnership with families and other professionals, to help children and young people achieve their full potential. Educational psychologists support schools and the local authority to improve all children’s experiences of learning.

They use their training in psychology and knowledge of child development to assess difficulties children may be having with their learning. They provide advice and training on how schools might help children to learn and develop. They recommend methods, or develop strategies in partnership with schools, to help a child learn more effectively. Strategies may include teaching approaches, improvements to learning environments, advice on curriculum materials and behaviour support.

Educational psychologists also keep up-to-date with best practice, policy and research relating to how children learn and make sure this informs local policy and practice.

Educational psychologists may also be involved in, and advise, local authority groups considering additional support for learning policy or provision. For more detailed information see the SDEP website.

How are educational psychology services organised?

Educational psychology services may differ from area to area. In many cases a school, cluster of schools or local area will be assigned an educational psychologist or team of psychologists who work closely with school staff to support them.

In most areas a practice agreement between the school/s and the educational psychology service is drawn up, setting out the services that will be provided throughout the school year. This is reviewed and checked to make sure it is working for everyone involved.

How do educational psychologists get involved with a child?

A child may come to the attention of an educational psychologist in a number of ways. If a child is born with a condition that means they may have learning difficulties, or it is clear from an early age they may need extra support to learn or develop, an educational psychologist may be part of an early years multi-agency assessment team.

Once a child is attending pre-school or school a child’s additional support needs may be picked up during play, normal classroom teaching or the school’s own assessment processes. A teacher may raise concerns with the educational psychologist and request further assessment, advice or support. Any direct work with a child is done with the full consent of a child’s parents or carers.

If a parent is concerned their child is struggling at school, they have the right to ask their education authority to find out whether their child has additional support needs and to request a specific assessment (which can include an educational psychology assessment). To find out more information see The parents’ guide to additional support for learning.

How do educational psychologists assess a child?

The assessment of a child’s additional support needs is not a one-off activity carried out by an educational psychologist. Assessment is part of the day-to day routine of learning and teaching. In some cases, an educational psychologist will carry out further investigation of a child’s needs. Assessment is not separate from the strategies that are put in place to support a child. The information which educational psychologists gather contributes to the planning, action and review process.

If further investigation is needed, the educational psychologist will collect information about the child’s learning and development. This may be done by:

  • talking to the child’s current or previous teachers
  • talking to the child’s parents
  • analysing the child’s school work and approach to learning
  • observing the child in the classroom
  • considering the child’s emotional and social development and behaviour
  • talking to the child themselves.

In some cases an assessment may be carried out without involving the child directly.

How do educational psychologists support schools?

Educational psychologists work with schools to help them look at the needs of the whole child so they are able to be included fully in class, school and community life.

They provide advice to head teachers and school staff where needed and provide training to help staff to develop skills to support children with specific needs and enhance all children’s learning. They provide advice on target setting for children’s learning plans. They are not responsible for drawing up or implementing plans in schools.

They help schools to communicate about a child’s needs and support them to fully involve parents.

Do educational psychologists only work with school age children?

Educational psychologists do not just work with children and young people in school, they work with families with very young children in early years settings and in planning for young people leaving school and moving on to employment or further education.

Do educational psychologists decide which school a child attends?

Educational psychologists work for the local authority providing their analysis of children’s needs and how these can be met in particular environments. They may be involved in discussion, and consultation with parents, relating to which type of school placement would best meet a child’s educational needs. The final decision about where a child is placed lies with the local authority.

Parents have the right to make a placing request for their child to attend a particular school and to appeal this if refused. More information can be found in our Placing Request factsheet.

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Statistics books for educational psychologists? - Psychology

AllPsychlopedia Psychology Reference

Timeline of Psychology f rom 387 BC to the present.

Psychology Biographies of important psychologists in history.

Psychology Dictionary with over 500 psychology terms defined.

Psychology Bookshelf with book reviews and recommendations for students of all ages.

Psychiatric Disorders includes symptoms, etiology, treatment and prognosis for over 50 of the most common disorders.

Optical Illusions that may make you doubt your own eyes.

Online Psychology Quizzes to test your knowledge and understanding of psychological principles and theory.


Continuing Education

Introduction

Effective January 1, 2021, New York State Education Law requires each licensed psychologist to complete 36 hours of acceptable formal continuing education during each three-year registration period. However, there is a phase-in period for this requirement for licensees whose next registration period starts during the first three years after January 1, 2021. These licensees will have to complete one hour of acceptable formal continuing education for each month in their registration period after January 1, 2021. Please refer to the chart below for the continuing education hours required during this initial phase-in period.

This document is designed to respond to frequently asked questions regarding the mandatory continuing education requirements. It is not a substitute for reading the relevant provisions of law, rule or regulation.

General Information

  1. Is there a difference between "licensure" and "registration"?

Yes. In New York State, upon satisfying the licensure eligibility requirements, a "license" is awarded. Licensure is for life unless suspended, revoked or annulled for reasons of misconduct.

In order to both practice as a licensed psychologist in New York State and use the restricted titles &ldquolicensed psychologist&rdquo or &ldquopsychologist, psychology or psychological&rsquo or any derivative within New York State, a licensee must be currently "registered." Registration is for a three-year period, except for the first registration renewal after licensure, which is pro-rated to move licensees to month of birth renewal. See FAQ #9 below for information about periods other than 36 months.

Continuing Education Requirements

  1. Am I required to take continuing education?

Yes. Every licensed psychologist practicing with his or her New York State license must complete the required acceptable formal continuing education in order to register, except in the first registration period after initial licensure (seeQuestion #4 below). As a practicing licensed psychologist, you are required to complete 36 hours of acceptable formal continuing education during each three-year registration period. However, during the initial phase-in period, starting January 1, 2021, the number of hours necessary will be pro-rated at the rate of one hour per month for each month of the registration period.

If you are returning to practice as a licensed psychologist in New York State, you may have to complete pro-rated hours of continuing education. This calculation will depend on whether or not you were practicing the psychology profession in New York State and/or another state before you apply to re-register in New York State.

I just received my license parchment. Since I am in my first registration period, do I need to take continuing education courses immediately?

You are not required to complete continuing education during your initial three-year registration period. However, you will need to complete a pro-rated number of hours based on the length of your second registration period which is adjusted based on your birth month.

No, the law provides an exemption from the continuing education requirement for the first three-year registration period in which one is licensed as a licensed psychologist in this State.

You must complete continuing education from a Department-approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists on or after January 1, 2021 in order for it to be acceptable under the law and regulations. Courses or activities taken prior to the January 1, 2021 effective date of the law are not acceptable for satisfying the triennial registration continuing education requirements.

You will receive your registration renewal notice about 4 months before the end of your current registration period. You have the option of registering online or by mail. However, you should not file your registration application until you have met the continuing education requirement. If you indicate you have not met the requirement, your registration will be placed on hold until you submit verification to the State Board.

If you will not meet the continuing education requirement by the end of your registration period, then you may apply for a conditional registration (see Question 37 below).

Licensees whose first re-registration date following January 1, 2021, occurs less than three years from that date, but on or after January 1, 2021, will have to complete one hour of acceptable formal continuing education for each month in the period beginning January 1, 2021. Licensees must attest to whether or not they have met the requirement as part of the registration application for the next three-year period.

If you are due to register for the period beginning:

You will be required to complete the following number of hours of continuing education:

No. Registration periods may be adjusted so that subsequent renewals will occur during a licensee's month of birth. If your registration period is less than three years, count the number of months of the registration period to determine the number of continuing education hours required. You must complete one hour of continuing education for each month. For example, if your registration period is from January 1, 2022 to June 30, 2024, this is a 30-month registration period therefore, you are required to complete 30 hours of acceptable continuing education during it.

Continuing Education Hours

  1. What constitutes an hour of continuing education?

A minimum of 50 minutes equals one continuing education contact hour. Courses must be offered in terms of contact hours no other time measurement is acceptable.

No. Under Education Law §7607(2), continuing education hours may not be carried over to a subsequent registration period.

No. The required continuing education may be completed anytime during the current registration period. Thus, licensed psychologists have the flexibility to select and schedule the continuing education activities that are most appropriate for their professional practice.

Compliance

  1. What if there are circumstances which make it impossible for me to comply?

    There are three possible options that may be available to you, if there are circumstances that make it impossible for you to comply with the continuing education requirements in a timely manner. However, you must submit the Registration Remittance Addendum with your Registration Renewal Document before your request for one of the options listed below can be considered.

Inactive Status

A registration may be placed on inactive status if the licensee will not be practicing in New York State. There is no time limit placed on an inactive registration, but you will have to complete continuing education hours in order to return to practice. (See, Questions 15 & 16).

The Department may grant an adjustment to the continuing education requirements for the current registration period if the licensee documents and the Department determines that there is good cause that prevents compliance. The Department may grant an adjustment for the following reasons:

  • poor health or a specific physical or mental disability certified by an appropriate health care professional(s)
  • extended active duty with the Armed Forces of the United States or
  • other good cause beyond the licensee&rsquos control, which in the Department&rsquos judgment, makes it impossible for the licensee to comply with the continuing education requirements in a timely manner.

Conditional Registration

If you are not practicing or if you are returning to practice

    If I am licensed in New York State but my registration is currently inactive, do I need to complete continuing education before I can reactivate my registration?

If you have notified the Department that you are not practicing the profession, your registration will be placed on "inactive" status. You do not have to complete any continuing education hours during the period that you are on "inactive" status. You do not have to be registered in order to attend and complete continuing education courses so that, if you so choose, you can remain current on practice during your inactive period. Please see Question 14 for information on requesting an inactive status.

Will I have to make up the continuing education hours if and when I return to the practice of licensed psychology in New York?

Yes. If you wish to return to practice after January 1, 2021, you will have to complete the number of continuing education hours that would have been due, if you were actively practicing at the time of your current registration. For example, since the law is effective on January 1, 2021, a licensee who was inactive prior to that date and who wishes to return to practice on June 1, 2021 would be required to complete 5 hours of acceptable continuing education hours, which would be the total number of months from January 1, 2021 to May 31, 2021, the period during which the licensee was inactive after the effective date of the law. In order to register to practice during the period starting June 1, 2021, the licensee would have to complete the 5 hours and submit certificates from Department approved providers before the Department will register the licensee to practice.

As of January 1, 2021, in order to reactivate your registration in New York State when you have been practicing psychology in another state, you will need to complete at least one hour of acceptable continuing education for each month your registration was inactive. The Department will not reactivate your registration until you make up the continuing education requirement deficiency that you accrued during the period your registration was on "inactive" status.

Please be aware that, in addition to making up the deficiency that you accrued during the period that your registration was on "inactive" status, you will have to complete the continuing education hours that would be otherwise due for the new registration period.

For example, a licensee who practiced in another state from January 1, 2022 until December 31, 2023 and returns to practice in New York State on January 1, 2024 would be required to complete 24 hours of acceptable continuing education for the period from January 1, 2022 until December 31, 2023, before the licensee could be registered to practice in New York State. The licensee would also have to complete 36 hours of acceptable continuing education for the period that ends on December 31, 2026, which would be the end of the licensee&rsquos three-year registration period, after his or her registration is reactivated.

If you were practicing in another jurisdiction, you may use acceptable continuing education hours that were accrued from a Department-approved provider of psychology continuing education up to 36 months prior to the beginning of your new registration period.

Courses and Providers of Continuing Education

  1. What courses are acceptable for continuing education?

To be acceptable the courses must be administered:

  • by a Department-approved provider and
  • in an approved subject area (see Question 25 for a listing of approved subject areas)
  • preparing and teaching a course offered by a Department-approved provider of psychology continuing education on or after January 1, 2021, provided that the course being taught has not been presented on more than one occasion without presenting new or revised material
  • preparing and teaching a course, acceptable to the Department, at a higher education institution or a psychotherapy institute, as defined in section 72.6(a)(2) and (3) of the Commissioner&rsquos Regulations, relating to the practice of psychology on or after January 1, 2021, provided that the course has not been taught by the licensee on more than one occasion without presenting new or revised material
  • making a technical presentation at a professional conference sponsored by an organization that is a Department-approved provider of psychology continuing education on or after January 1, 2021, provided that the presentation has not been offered on more than one occasion without presenting new or revised material
  • completing a self-study program on or after January 1, 2021, offered by a Department-approved provider, provided that self-study hours do not comprise more than twelve hours in any three-year registration period or one-third of the hours for a registration period other than three years
  • authoring a first-time article in the practice of psychology published in a peer-reviewed journal or a chapter in a published book, on or after January 1, 2021
  • authoring a first-time book in the practice of licensed psychology, on or after January 1, 2021
  • completing independent study, defined as individualized professional study that is self-initiated, goal-driven learning based on reading and research, on or after January 1, 2021 provided that no more than one-third of the continuing education hours in any period may be independent study and
  • completing a mentorship, as either a mentor or mentee as defined in law and regulations, on or after January 1, 2021 provided that no more than one-half of the required continuing education hours in any period may be completed in a mentorship.

Each Department-approved provider determines the length of the course to be offered and then will determine the hours according to the following: the awarding of continuing education hours is based on a contact hour which is equivalent to 50 minutes of an organized learning activity and a 10 minute break. Thus, a program of two clock hours would be awarded 2.0 continuing education hours.

Other activities completed on or after January 1, 2021, such as those listed in the following chart may be approved for the amount of hours indicated.

Acceptable Activities

Continuing Education Hours

Successful completion of a credit- or non-credit bearing course at a higher education institution that is related to the practice of psychology and is offered by a provider approved by the Department to offer continuing education to licensed psychologists and in a subject area that is acceptable to the Department.

15 continuing education hours per each semester course credit hour, i.e., 3 credit course = 45 continuing education hours.

Preparing and teaching a credit bearing course in a higher education institution or psychotherapy institute approved by the Department to offer licensed psychology continuing education and is in an approved subject area that is acceptable to the Department and meets the requirements of regulations, i.e., the licensee is teaching the course for the first time or is presenting new or revised material.

Continuing education hours may include the actual instruction time plus up to two additional hours for preparation time for each hour of presentation. This means that a licensee could be credited with acceptable continuing education hours for developing and presenting a three-semester hour credit course, as follows: 45 + (45 x 2) = 135 hours for a three-semester hour course.

Preparing and teaching a continuing education course for an approved provider that is in an approved subject matter area and meets the requirements of regulations, i.e., the licensee is teaching the course for the first time or is presenting new or revised material.

For every in-class continuing education hour, one hour of continuing education credit may be awarded plus up to two additional hours for preparation time for each hour of presentation. A licensee could be credited with 6 hours of acceptable continuing education credit for a two-hour course, i.e., 2 + (2 x 2) = 6.

Making a technical presentation at a professional conference sponsored by an organization that is an approved provider of licensed psychology continuing education that is in an approved subject matter area and meets the requirements of regulations, i.e., the licensee is presenting the information for the first time or is presenting new or revised material.

For every presentation contact hour, one hour of continuing education credit may be awarded plus up to two additional hours for preparation time for each hour of presentation.

Authoring a first-time article published in a peer-reviewed journal or a chapter in a published book on the practice of licensed psychology.

2 hours of continuing education.

Authoring a first-time book on the practice of licensed psychology.

5 hours of continuing education.

Completing a structured, self-study program offered by a licensed psychology provider approved by the Department that is based on audio, audio-visual, written, on-line or other media and does not include live instruction that allows the licensee to interact with the instructor and/or other students.

One hour of continuing education credit for each 50-minute hour of instruction, as determined by the approved provider. Self-study may comprise no more than 12 continuing education hours in any three-year registration period, or one-third of the hours for a registration period other than 36 months.

Completing independent study that is self-initiated, goal-driven learning based on reading and research in accordance with law and regulations.

Three clock hours of independent study shall equal 1 continuing education hour.

Serving as a mentor or a mentee in a professional relationship between two licensed psychologists, in accordance with the requirements in law and regulation.

Fifteen hours in a mentoring relationship shall equal 1 continuing education hour.

In order to offer continuing education to licensed psychologists, an organization or individual must be approved by the Department, based upon a complete application, along with the submission of the required fee. For information about how to become an approved provider, please see:

See here for a listing of providers that have been approved by the Department to offer psychology continuing education. The listing will be updated on a regular basis, as provider applications are reviewed and approved by the Office of the State Board for Psychology.

Courses that are taken from a provider that has not been approved by the Department cannot be used to satisfy the continuing education requirement. The Office of the State Board for Psychology will not review individual courses or submissions of course work from non-approved providers. Courses taken prior to the effective date of the law (January 1, 2021) are not acceptable. NOTE: A provider approved by the Department to offer continuing education to New York State licensed psychologists is not authorized to approve other individuals or organizations to offer continuing education to New York State licensees.

Yes. The law requires that each licensee completes a minimum of 3 hours of coursework in professional ethics, including the laws, rules and regulations for practice in New York State in any 36-month period. Providers who offer acceptable courses in this subject area are indicated on the list of approved providers on our website. Otherwise, it is your responsibility to complete coursework in subjects that improve your knowledge, skills and abilities in the practice of psychology as defined in Education Law section 7601-a or other activities defined as acceptable activities, as listed in Question 21. This provides you with the flexibility to meet your education needs in your current position or for a future position. For instance, a licensed psychologist who engages in practice with the aging could take courses in his or her area of practice, such as theories of aging, the effect of dementia on families and spouses, and access to dementia services for culturally diverse clients.

Is there any limitation on the subject matter of the coursework?

Yes. The subject matter must contribute to the professional practice of licensed psychology, as defined in section 7601-a of the Education Law. Acceptable subjects may include, but are not limited to, clinical interventions and evidence-based practice psychology research and program evaluation cross-disciplinary offerings from medicine, law, administration, education, behavioral and social sciences related to psychology practice, patient communications, recordkeeping, and matters relating to law and/or ethics which contribute to professional practice in psychology and the health, safety, and/or welfare of the public.

Yes. Any continuing education that is designed for the sole purpose of personal development, marketing, business practices, and maximizing profits for the practice of a licensed psychologist will not be considered by the Department as acceptable continuing education.

Similarly, the supervision of a licensed professional, limited permit holder, student or intern in a placement that is part of a license-qualifying program, is not considered as acceptable continuing education by the Department.

Yes. Independent study, which is defined as individualized professional study that is self-initiated, goal-driven learning based on reading and research, is acceptable for satisfying the continuing education requirement for licensed psychologists. However, no more than one-third of the continuing education requirement can be met through independent study. The licensee must prepare a narrative account of what was learned and an overall written evaluation of the learning activity. Three clock hours of independent study equal one continuing education hour.

Self-study courses offered by Department-approved providers may be counted toward the continuing education requirement. They are structured study, offered by a Department-approved provider that are based on audio, audio-visual, written, on-line and other media. Self-study courses do not include live instruction (transmitted in person or otherwise) during which the student may communicate and interact with the instructor and other students. No more than one-third of the continuing education requirement may be completed through self-study from approved providers. Formal and self-study courses offered by Department-approved providers assure relevant course content, effective evaluation, and recordkeeping by the provider. Self-study credit hours are determined by the Department approved continuing education provider, who must provide a completion certificate to the licensee.

Yes. A licensee may earn credit in a one-to-one relationship that consists of a minimum of 15 clock hours of direct contact between the mentor and mentee. The mentor and mentee must be licensed and registered to practice as a psychologist in New York State under Article 153 of the Education Law. The mentor must have at least 5 years of post-licensure experience in the subject of the mentoring. The mentorship must meet the following criteria: 1) the mentor and the mentee must develop written mentee goals that must be met by the mentee during the mentorship 2) the mentor must develop a written teaching plan that must guide the mentorship and must provide for the formal evaluation of the mentee in writing 3) the mentee must prepare a narrative account of what was learned in the mentorship and an overall evaluation of the mentorship. A licensee who is either a mentor or a mentee who completes a mentorship that meets these requirements must receive one continuing education hour of credit for each 15 hours in a mentoring relationship. No more than one-half of the mandatory continuing education requirement in any registration period may be completed through either mentoring or receiving mentoring as a mentee, and the mentor or mentee must not receive credit for activity that is conducted as part of their professional employment.

In order to receive credit for in-service and training programs provided by an employer, the employer must be a Department-approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists. Additionally, the in-service training must be clearly related to the enhancement of psychology practice, skills, and knowledge and the health, safety, and/or welfare of the public.

To become an approved provider, the employer must meet all the requirements in the Education Law and Commissioner&rsquos Regulations, which, include, but are not limited to, submitting an application, with the required fee, to the Department. The application to become a Department-approved provider can be found here.

All courses/educational activities must be taken from a Department-approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists. As part of the provider approval process, the Office of the State Board for Psychology will review proposed courses/educational activities in the areas listed above that may be offered by a prospective provider of continuing education for New York State licensed psychologists. Please refer to Question 25 for more information.

Recordkeeping and Reporting

  1. What records will I have to keep?

Providers must issue a Certificate of Completion to licensees who complete courses for continuing education hours. Licensees must retain, in their records, information regarding completed acceptable continuing education for six years from the date of completion of the coursework/educational activity.

A Certificate of Completion should include the following information:

  • name of licensee completing the course, licensed profession and license number
  • title of the course or program, subject area, and any identification number assigned to it by the provider
  • the educational method used (e.g., live in-person, live online, and/or self-study)
  • number of contact hours completed
  • the approved provider's name and any identifying number
  • verification by the provider of the licensee’s attendance or participation
  • the date and location (city/state) of the course or activity and
  • a statement indicating that the organization is recognized by the Department’s State Board for Psychology as a Department-approved provider of licensed psychologist continuing education.

However, the licensee is responsible for providing documentation of other educational activities that are defined as acceptable continuing education under the Commissioner’s Regulations. The following examples are a non-exhaustive list:

  • course descriptions, handouts and brochures that may document the licensee’s first-time preparation and teaching a course offered by a Department-approved provider of continuing education to licensed psychologists
  • article published for the first-time in a peer-reviewed journal, or a chapter in a book in the practice of psychology
  • syllabi, power point slides, and examinations that are part of a course that was prepared and taught for the first time in a higher education institution or psychotherapy institute, as defined in sections 76.2(a)(2) and (3) of the Commissioner’s Regulations
  • narrative account of what was learned and an overall written evaluation of an independent study learning activity or
  • documentation of participation in a mentorship relationship, as a mentor or mentee, that includes the name of the mentor and mentee, mentee goals, the teaching plan of the mentor, the evaluation of the mentee by the mentor, the narrative account of the mentee of what was learned, and the evaluation of the mentorship by the mentee or mentor, as appropriate.

No. However, you must retain your continuing education records for six years because you are required to make your continuing education records available for inspection by the Department upon its request. Random samples of mandatory continuing education records are audited by the Department to ensure compliance with the continuing education requirement.

The Department randomly audits a percentage of licensees each month, as well as those licensees who applied for a conditional registration and those who previously failed an audit. You must provide the Department with your Certificates of Completion for each approved continuing education course or records for other educational activities, when requested. In no cases will self-reporting forms be acceptable.

You may be subject to disciplinary proceedings for professional misconduct. According to section 29.1 of the Rules of the Board of Regents, willfully making or filing a false report constitutes unprofessional conduct. Penalties for such misconduct may include censure and reprimand, fine, and/or suspension or revocation of your license.

What if I fail to complete the required number of hours but wish to continue practicing in New York?

  • agree to complete the required hours of continuing education from the previous registration period during the period of conditional registration,
  • complete the regular continuing education requirement at a rate of one hour per month for the one-year conditional registration period and no more than one-third of the continuing education hours may be completed as self-study,
  • complete any additional education which the Department may require,
  • complete and submit the Registration Remittance Addendum (if you submitted a paper registration application), and
  • pay the fee for the conditional registration, which is equal to the amount of the regular registration fee ($179) and the continuing education fee ($50) for a total fee of $229.

Conditional registrations are valid for no more than one year and are not renewable. This means you MUST meet the continuing education requirements by the end of the conditional period. You will not be issued a registration for the remaining two years until you meet these requirements. Remember - if you are not registered you may not practice your profession in New York State.

Can a third-party maintain my continuing education records?

Yes. You may have a third-party, such as a professional association, maintain your continuing education records. In the event of a Department audit or at the end of a conditional registration period, you would have to request that the third-party provide you with Certificates of Completion for the courses or educational activities that were completed during the time period in question.

Further Information

  1. How can I obtain more information?


NUTRITIONAL PSYCHOLOGY CURRICULUM FOR MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

Nutritional Psychology curriculum in development provides professionals with psycho-educational tools to help their clients develop the cognitive, behavioral, and perceptual skills needed for understanding the effects their dietary intake patterns may be having on their mood, behavior and mental health. NP gives mental health professionals another important piece of the puzzle for supporting their clients’ mental health and well-being by helping them understand how and why they can use food as a tools to improve the way they feel.

CNP keeps you informed with the latest diet-mental health news

More Evidence Links Ultra-Processed Foods to Health Harms

People who eat lots of ultra-processed foods are more likely to develop heart disease and to die sooner than those who stick with foods in their original form, two large studies conclude.

Fast Food Makes the Immune System More Aggressive in the Long Term

Unhealthy food seems to make the body's defenses more aggressive in the long term.

A Closer Look at the Importance of Gut Mechanisms in Depression

The variety of genes in gut bacteria is greater than 100 times the quantity of the human genome.


Statistics for Psychology

This concise, easy-to-understand and highly visual book helps students to understand the principles behind the many statistical practices. This text helps students to build a mental map to enable them to work their way through tests and procedures with a better level of understanding (and ultimately feel more confident and get better grades). Statistical analysis will also be covered in the book in the same simple-to-follow way, without messy details or complicated formulae. However, this approach does not lead to simple understanding. Instead it allows students to really grasp how to use, and be creative with, statistics.

  • A principles-based approach, helping students to apply and adapt their skills to a variety of situation
  • Test out principles in practice on the companion website with statistics scenarios
  • Carefully designed graphics to explain statistical principles
  • Links to relevant sources / further reading for statistical packages, so the book can be used as a portal to/ springboard for further study.
  • Developed in conjunction with students means this book answers the key challenges students face.
  • Based on a BPS commended programme

Supported by a wealth of online resources at www.sagepub.co.uk/statisticsforpsychology

Supplements

For students:

• Brand new animations for every chapter that either summarizes the chapter or explores a difficult area.
• More detail online – key theories or difficult concepts are marked in the book and explored in further detail online.
• ‘Work With Us’ – a whole suite of activities have been created for you to work through as you read the book.
• A data generator for you to practice with and work out your answers to ‘Work With Us’.
• Answers to the ‘Your Turn’ feature in the book
• Online bibliography
• Glossary flashcards for difficult terms,
• Links to authors’ Brawstat website tool which gives students real-life practice of statistics.
https://sites.google.com/site/brawstatsguide/home/students-and-brawstats

For lecturers:

• Lecturer’s guide to teaching statistics that maps the books content to traditional approaches to teaching statistics for psychology.

This book is great. It is clear and accessible, yet comprehensive and integrated. Students can make use of it at any level of their education because it is layered or you can skim for the essentials or delve into the depths. A fabulous addition to the market.!

I love the fact that the book is so concisely and clearly written, yet with sufficiently detailed and with great suggestions for further reading. For me, this makes it the preferred statistics book easy to approach and to keep in regular use!

This book will be a great help in making statistics accessible to all. In addition to guiding the reader through theory and statistical formulae, it provides really helpful examples and explanations. A must-have book for any statistics bookshelf!

This book is great! It’s written in a way that is both engaging and easy to follow and avoids all the stress inducing jargon of most other stats textbooks available. I cannot recommend this enough to anyone starting out in stats or those just needing a bit of a refresher course!

I am a firm believer that many of students' difficulties with statistics learning stem from a lack of understanding about the bigger picture of statistics and research in psychology. This book explicitly emphasises the importance of the bigger picture of statistics, so students understand why they need to learn statistics, not just how to run particular tests. The book is visually interesting, well structured to ease students in, and written in an accessible language that makes statistics seem much more manageable.

“This is the statistics textbook equivalent of vegetable soup: goes down easily and it’s good for you. This is a great text for a new generation of Psychology researchers who aim to do reproducible work the book clearly and logically connects study design to analysis, while instilling good research practices.”

A well thought out book, written in clear easy to understand language. By using a single example of a research question, (whether a risk-taking affects exam performance) the authors introduce students to some of the basic statistical tests as well as data manipulation and understanding the relationships between variables. High on theory and low on math, this is a good introductory textbook for first-year students.

I love this book, it is very well structured and is easy to follow. I think one reason for this is because it uses an example hypothesis throughout the book, thus it leaves no place for confusion. More importantly, its explicit and simple wording helps to understand the frightening topic of statistics better, takes away the fear and makes statistics a very interesting part of psychology.

This is an outstanding book. Transitioning from my old and standard psychology statistics textbook required by my class to this textbook was the best thing I could have ever done. The format is easily approachable and truly engages the reader, making the learning process much quicker and more enjoyable. Not only did my grades improve but I now also have a greater long-lasting understanding of the mechanisms and applications of psychology statistics within my own research.

An engaging text for psychology students learning foundational statistics. Of great value to the beginner student, is the initial section answering: Why do we need statistics? An incredibly common question amongst psychology students who aim to be consumers, rather than producers of statistics. This book helps students to develop an appreciation for the worth of statistics in their professional life, enabling graduates to become more confident and competent in tackling real community issues.

I firmly believe the combination of presentation elements will aid students in developing their statistical literacy. The fonts and icons remind me of a study bullet-journal, and I think this will encourage students to be more reflective in their statistics learning. This textbook also includes a companion website for students, with practice questions and answers, videos, and relevant articles. It encourages curiosity and a sense of discovery, critical traits in the social sciences.

The significance of Statistics for Psychology: A beginner’s guide is that it provides an easy-to-read style of material structured to build on previous knowledge. The student is guided through the conceptual complexities that arise with the study of statistics, as it challenges their day-to-day way of thinking. Given the relevancy of the textbook by including new statistics as well as null hypothesis significance tests, I expect it to have longevity in the university classroom. I highly recommend this text for introductory psychology statistics classes.